Probiotic Skincare: A New Frontier in the Pursuit of Youthful Skin

What do you think of first when you read the word ‘probiotics’? Gut health, right?

Well, it turns out probiotics can help you with so much more than your digestion. For instance, have you heard about probiotic skincare?

If you’re struggling with unsightly blemishes, discoloration, or some other type of skin issue, there is a chance that probiotics could help.

Let’s take a closer look…

The Basics

If you’re taking a probiotic, you’re taking a capsule full of beneficial bacteria in order to boost the “good” bacteria already in your system. Probiotics are also found in foods such as sauerkraut and yogurt. And there’s been a lot of buzz about how they can help your digestion for years now…

But these days, there’s more and more evidence that probiotics may help more than just your gut — welcome news for people suffering from issues such as acne, eczema, and rosacea.1

Topical Products For Probiotic Skin Care

Lactobacillus Acidophilus | Probiotic America News

There are quite a few probiotic skin care products on the market now, and many of them are topical — meaning you apply them to the surface of your skin. These include cleansers, creams, and masks.

And these work because your immune system works for your whole body — including your skin. In some cases, the immune system senses that there are foreign microorganisms present on the surface of your skin, and it reacts by fighting those invaders. And that’s great, until it leaves behind pain, redness, swelling, and blemishes in its wake.2,3

A topical probiotic can also keep your immune system from attacking perceived threats to the skin.4

That’s because the beneficial bacteria in this type of product could neutralize or crowd out bad bacteria — so what’s left on your “skin microbiome” is actually good for you. And that, in turn, could prevent the cells of the skin from producing an immune system response.5

The “skin microbiome” is a term used to describe the overall community of microbes that live on the skin. It’s very important that the skin microbiome has a good balance between beneficial and harmful microbes. If there are too many harmful bacteria present, it can lead to skin problems.6,7

Oral Probiotics and Skin Care

Oral probiotics can also help people suffering from skin issues.8

Probiotic Skin Care | Probiotic America

Lots of supplements contain groups of beneficial bacteria known as Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium. These bacteria have an effect known as the “gut-brain-skin axis effect.”

You see, stress and a poor diet can lead to a slowing of the digestive process.9  As a result, unhealthy bacteria can overtake the gut and weaken the gastrointestinal tract allowing toxins to enter the bloodstream. This string of events can result in the development of frustrating skin issues.10

However, recent studies show a relationship between oral probiotics and an improvement in skin conditions. For example, one study involving nearly 60 acne sufferers showed that drinking a beverage fortified with Lactobacillus bacteria saw a decrease in acne lesions.11

In another study, half of the participants received an oral probiotic supplement to take with their usual treatments for rosacea and acne. The other half only received their standard treatments.

The group taking the probiotic saw a bigger improvement in symptoms than the group that did not receive the supplement.12

Probiotic Skin Care | Probiotic America

There’s also evidence suggesting that probiotics may be able to help support your body as it builds collagen — the substance that helps makes your skin appear firmer. As a result, probiotics could potentially help reduce wrinkling and the other visual signs of aging skin.13

Another potential benefit of probiotic skin care is the ability of beneficial bacteria to promote the production of ceramides. These are molecules that act as a sort of “glue,” helping skin cells bond together. And they play a key role in helping to moisten the skin.14

Turns out, probiotic products help to inhibit the growth of harmful bacteria by producing lactic acid. Lactic acid not only reduces the number of bad bacteria on the skin, it also helps good bacteria flourish.15

Wrapping Things Up

Research is only beginning to expose the potential of probiotic skin care. But if the early results are any indication, it appears that probiotics can deliver substantial benefits that could help greatly improve your appearance.

As with any new skin care regimen, however, talk to your doctor first to make sure he or she agrees that it will be safe to try probiotic products.

Learn More:
9 Gut Friendly Foods That Supercharge Your Health
NEWS: Probiotics May Provide Help with Allergies
Everything You Need to Know About Probiotics (a complete guide)


Sources
1.https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/26/health/acne-eczema-skin-bacteria.html
2.https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rosacea/symptoms-causes/syc-20353815
3.https://www.rosacea.org/patients/causes/immunesystem
4.https://www.aad.org/media/news-releases/could-probiotics-be-the-next-big-thing-in-acne-and-rosacea-treatments
5.http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352647515000155
6.https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/316803.php
7.https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/02/a-personalized-probiotic-skin-cream-made-with-a-persons-own-microbes/517473
8.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3038963
9.https://www.healthline.com/health-news/are-probiotics-answer-to-acne
10.https://nypost.com/2016/04/06/the-secret-to-sofia-vergaras-gorgeous-skin
11.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20692602
12.https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/27e8/56f9a1df44e1f81729c1b293ea3b1179f089.pdf
13.http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jam.12137/full
14.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18336739
15.http://dermatologytimes.modernmedicine.com/dermatology-times/news/skincare-products-probiotics

Sapodilla: The Strange Fruit With Incredible Health Benefits

If you haven’t heard of the sapodilla, or sapota fruit, you’re definitely not alone.

If you’re like most people, you’re familiar with fruits that you see at your local grocery store: apples, oranges, bananas, etc. The end.

But if you enjoy trying new foods that are beneficial to your health, then this is one Central American fruit that you may want to investigate.

Here’s some information on where the sapodilla comes from and some of the health benefits that it might provide.

Sapodilla 101

Sapodilla | Probiotic America

The sapodilla tree is native to the northern parts of Central America and the southern portion of Mexico. It’s also known as the Manilkara Zapota tree.1 The tree belongs to the Sapotaceae family, which also includes the Mamey Sapote and Green Sapote.2

The fruit that comes from the tree is also known as the Sapota fruit or the Chikoo fruit.3

A ripe sapodilla has a sweet flavor, comparable to a mango, with a yellowish-brown hue. It’s also very juicy.

During immaturity, the flesh of the fruit contains a latex substance used to make chicle – an ingredient that was historically used in the making of chewing gum.4

Potential Health Benefits

Sapodilla, also known as Chikoo fruit, is rich in vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber, and protein.5,Here are just some of the health benefits associated with the fruit.

Vitamin C –

You’ll get nearly 15 milligrams (mg) of vitamin C in a 100-gram serving of sapota fruit (the sapota fruit typically weighs about 150g).7 Research indicates that the vitamin C found in fruits and other foods, as well as supplements, could reduce the risk of heart problems.8

Fiber content –

The sapodilla fruit is also a great source of dietary fiber. You’ll get about 5g of fiber per 100g-serving.9

Of course, fiber is very important to the digestive process. It helps keep stools firm so they move at the correct pace through the intestines. Fiber can also reduce cholesterol and blood sugar levels and help you maintain a healthy weight.10

Calcium –

The sapodilla fruit provides 21mg of calcium in a 100g-serving.11 This mineral is important not just for building strong bones but also in terms of keeping them strong as we get older. Calcium also plays a role in keeping our blood circulating properly and helping us control our muscles.12

Potassium –

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, just 100g of this fruit provides a whopping 193 mg of potassium.13 Potassium is also very important to maintaining bone health, especially in older women.14 Potassium is also associated with improved cardiovascular health, lower blood pressure, and a reduced risk of developing digestive problems such as inflammatory bowel disease.15

Magnesium –

You’ll get about 12mg of magnesium per 100g of sapodilla fruit.16 Magnesium plays a role in helping make bones stronger. A lack of this mineral has been associated with an increased risk of migraine headaches.17

How to Buy Sapodilla

You might be able to find sapodillas in your local farmer’s market. And there’s great news – the plant is evergreen, meaning it grow year round.18 As a result, it shouldn’t matter what time of the year it is when you look for it.

Sapodilla | Probiotic AmericaAlso, you’ll want the freshest fruit you can find. So make sure the fruit you buy doesn’t have any bruising, cracking, wrinkling, or cuts on the skin. If you buy an unripe sapodilla, you’ll need to keep it at room temperature for about 7-10 days until it ripens. The ripened fruit will usually last about six weeks in your refrigerator.19

A Final Word

The sapodilla fruit is rich in vitamins and minerals that are essential to your health. Plus, it tastes great. It would be worth it for you to give it a try. Before you do, however, have a talk with your doctor to make sure it will be safe to do so.

Learn More:
9 Gut Friendly Foods That Supercharge Your Health
Cheese Can Improve Gut Health! (find out which types to eat)
Eat Your Way to 100: 4 Longevity-Boosting Superfoods to Try Now


Sources
1.https://www.britannica.com/plant/sapodilla
2.http://rfcarchives.org.au/Next/Fruits/MameySapote/MameyGreenSapote1-89.htm
3.https://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/sapodilla.html
4.https://www.britannica.com/plant/sapodilla
5.https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/2382
6.https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/2382
7.https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/2382
8.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12875759
9.https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/2382
10.https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/fiber/art-20043983
11.https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/2382
12.https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/staying-healthy/calcium-nutrition-and-bone-health
13.https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/2382
14.http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/potassium
15.http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/potassium
16.https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/2382
17.https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/
18.https://www.britannica.com/plant/sapodilla
19.http://www.foodofy.com/sapodilla.html

Clean Eating: How to Do a Processed Foods Detox

Most processed foods are, quite frankly, filled with junk. Sugar, and many other ingredients found in these kinds of products, can have damaging effects on the body. Some processed foods even contain toxins.1 If you’re hooked on processed foods, you need to start cutting them out.

Here’s some information on why processed foods are really that bad for you, and some of the steps you can take to avoid (or eliminate) them entirely from your diet.

Why Are Processed Foods So Bad for the Body?

There are a lot of reasons why you need to avoid processed foods whenever possible. One of the most important is that they are usually loaded with sugar. Consuming too much sugar can really do a number on your system. It can make it harder, for example, for your body to process insulin. If that happens, it could lead to serious health issues.3 It can also lead to an increase in not only “bad” cholesterol (LDL), but also the accumulation of fat in the liver.4

Many types of processed foods are specifically made to be rewarding – too rewarding, in fact. They basically act against our body’s natural inclination to eat only what we need. We eat these foods, and we immediately want more … and more … and more. This can make it extremely hard for us to keep our weight at a healthy level.5

Artificial Ingredients

preservatives

Processed foods typically contain a lot of artificial ingredients. These are chemicals that are added to food for several different reasons. Preservatives, for instance, keep food from spoiling. Coloring is used to make a product more attractive. Flavors and textures are added as well. One of the more common processed food additives is monosodium glutamate, or MSG. This is actually a type of toxin that can damage cells in the body. Studies show that people can develop a sensitivity to MSG that can lead to headaches and muscle pain.6

Eating processed food can even introduce heavy metals, such as lead, mercury, and arsenic to the body. These toxins get into food for many reasons. Contamination can occur during the preparation and storage of the food, for instance. A heavy metal can also get into your body due to the equipment used to process products, as well as equipment used to package them.7

Breaking Free From Processed Foods

It can be challenging to try and cut processed foods out of a diet entirely. You’re so used to grabbing that sugar-filled snack that it becomes second nature. But there are ways to break free of processed foods and begin clean eating. Here are some tips that might help:

1. Buy local.

Your nearby farmer’s market offers a wide variety of fresh, wholesome foods that aren’t processed. Some grocery stores even feature sections of foods fresh from local farms. If you’re unsure of the source of your food, ask your grocer for help. You might also consider asking them to stock more fresh foods in the future (hey, it can and does work!).

2. Read the labels.

reading nutrition labels

The next time you’re in the supermarket, pay close attention to the artificial ingredients listed on the labels of the products you’re thinking of buying. A good rule of thumb is that if you can’t pronounce an ingredient, steer clear of that product.

3. Eat in.

It’s fun to go to a restaurant, but do you know all of the additives in the foods you’re being served? Either ask your server to give you a list of ingredients, or simply make your meals at home, using all-natural ingredients. That way, you’ll be in total control of what’s going into your body.

4. Sugar alert.

One of the best things you can do is to try and find products that are free of sugar. But corn syrup, one of the most common ingredients you’ll find in food, can be just as bad for your body.8 Again, this is where checking the label will be key.

5. Substitute good for bad.

So, you’ve got a potato chip addiction? It happens. But if you want to avoid processed foods, you’ll need to find an alternative. Non-fat popcorn might be a good choice. And if you’re a morning cereal eater, try switching to non-sweetened oatmeal for breakfast. You’ll eliminate loads of sugar that way.

6. Steer clear of fast food.

fast food options

Not all processed foods are found in a grocery store, of course. Most fast food dishes are loaded with processed ingredients. While fast food is convenient, it’s usually bad for your body. Bring some natural snacks with you on your next trip, and pack some homemade meals as well. And during the week, bring your lunch from home. Prepare some yummy salads or some grilled chicken to enjoy at the office. This way, you won’t be tempted to hit up a fast food joint on your break.

The Bottom Line

If you’re making healthy changes to your diet, start by nixing processed foods. It’s going to take a little time to adjust, but by finding good substitutions for your favorite “bad” foods, you will slowly adapt and begin to enjoy your good choices. By eating clean and eliminating the toxins from processed foods, you’ll know you’re doing the best thing you can to keep your body healthy!

Learn More:

What is the Healthiest Bread to Eat? (recipe inside)
7 Effective Strategies to Stop Food Cravings


Sources
1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10335377
2. https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/what-are-processed-foods.aspx
3. https://nutritionandmetabolism.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1743-7075-2-5
4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2673878/
5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22011680
6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19438927
7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10335377
8. https://www.livescience.com/52852-science-sugar-corn-syrup-health.html